Category: details in writing

Ideas for Writing Comparisons and Contrasts 0

Ideas for Writing Comparisons and Contrasts

I like to use a Venn diagram to lay out my ideas before I write a compare-contrast piece. Place the opposing topic. one on either side, the outer spaces of the circles. Place the way they are alike in the area where the two circles intersect.   Here’s as example of how to setup the Venn diagram: Before or During Sunrise  VS  During or After Sunset   Other general topics to get you thinking. Add detail words to limit the topic [largest (animals)] – [smallest (animals)]   largest-smallest                most treasured-least appreciated              summer-winter   easy-difficult                   heroic-senseless                                        bright-dark...

Getting Ready for NaNoWriMo? 0

Getting Ready for NaNoWriMo?

5 Tips About Writing with Rhythm by Mark Nichol from Daily Writing Tips Think of all the things you do each day, including mundane tasks like getting dressed, cooking meals, and speaking to other people. They all involve patterns or random sequences of ebb and flow: rhythm. Writing is like that, too. Just as with any other activity, rhythm in writing can occur automatically, but it’s improved by conscious attention. Here are five tips for enhancing your writing by attending to rhythm: Alternate Sentence Length Vary the word count for your sentences – not mathematically, not analytically, but naturally, organically....

Adjectives 1

Adjectives

Nouns share people, places and things important to a story. Verbs show action. Together they form the foundation of any story. Now, think your adjectives. They are like the petals of a flower; they enhance the core of your story by describing the nouns. Too many will drag down the flow of words, make the story droop with their weight; too few will leave a story petal-less, lacking details that allow the reader to paint their own picture and “see” what and where and to whom events are happening. Striking a balance means you share the best descriptive words you...

Planning a Story 0

Planning a Story

ONE WAY TO PLAN YOUR STORY There are lots of ways to plan a story but this one is an easy way to step into your ideas. Hope it works for you as well as it works for me.

A Writing Obstacle Course: Race to the End 2

A Writing Obstacle Course: Race to the End

Writing a story is a lot like running an obstacle course. It can’t be a straight line. To hold the attention and interest of readers it needs obstacles and problems to be dealt with along the way. Those problems need to build, creating an escalating reasons for a reader to finish the story/book. Recently I spoke with a person who read my novel,Tasman-An Innocent Convict’s Struggle for Freedom, in one sitting. She said she got so engaged that she couldn’t stop until she discovered Ean’s fate. Her comments had me floating for days. It verified that I’d created an obstacle...

The ABC’s of Student Writing Topics 0

The ABC’s of Student Writing Topics

Somewetimes students need a bit of inspiration to find a writing topic that interests them. Creating a potential list of topics for students is as simple as ABC: Feel free to add to or alter the list to match your needs. It’s always fun to play with words and topics to keep writing time fresh.

Quotes Worth a Look 0

Quotes Worth a Look

When I read, I often find author’s have exquisite sentences. I save them in a special notebook. Here are a few I’ve sincerely appreciated. She maneuvered through the cranky traffic…tempers caught fire as easily as backyards. Kristin Hannah in Magic Hour Perhaps there is a secret homing instinct in books that brings them to their perfect readers. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society¬† bby Mary Ann Shaffer & Anne Barrows As they crossed the street, the moon, at half-phase, spread creamy light over the world, trannsforming the sidewalk to pale ribbons and putting thick shadows beneath the trees… LaVyrle...

Powerful Vowels 1

Powerful Vowels

SCBWI (Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators) has a wonderful writer’s retreat each year. One year Darcy Pattison presented a discussion on the power of words, especially the energy of vowels. As readers and writers her ideas will shed light on how authors heighten energy in their stories. Here are a few details that may inspire you to occasionally stop and re-read for a different purpose. **High energy vowels include long e (tree), short i (sit) and long a (say). Compare these two sentences. Decide which provides more energy into the writing. The autumn I was seventeen, the nightmare...

Writing Strategies for ADHD Students Work for Other Writers as Well 1

Writing Strategies for ADHD Students Work for Other Writers as Well

Students who have ADHD issues are often in need of extra support during writing assignments. As I look at the suggestions, I see that most writers will benefit from a review of the 6 strategies mentioned in an online #Edutopia.com article I read last fall. 1. Focus on Your Assignment Be clear and specific in your expectations. For a suggested topic of a joyous moment, make your prompt more specific: Think about the last time you felt joyful and describe (a) when it was, (b) the event that gave you the joy, (c) how that feeling of joy felt within...

Facts in Fiction 0

Facts in Fiction

Grounding fiction with pertinent facts makes the story more beievable. To that end a writer needs to select facts that feel like they belong in the story. There must be a reason for their inclusion, a purpose that moves the story along. Examples: In the ballet trilogy (84 Ribbons, When the Music Stops: Dance On, and Letters to Follow: A Dancer’s Adventure) I used facts: real streets in real towns, real layouts of homes, real ballet music, and real scenery you’d see if you visited the places I had Marta and Lynne visited. I especially enjoyed my visits to The...